Going in for seat belts!

(Brett) #21

I’m shocked that they’ll be replacing the broken components and sticking with the attack belt setup. I’ll be keeping an eye on this thread to see what happens and how quickly.

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(David Martin) #22

Fortunately this dealer seems very willing to try to repair them, how long is the key! Service manager said their parts guy is good! Only took 6 months for a previous jag to be repaired!

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(Grooveman) #23

David …

I always like to see the glass as half full, but in this case I’ll give you great odds that it’s not going to happen.

Since this is a safety component I can’t believe they would risk the legal exposure to install used parts… so the question is where do you find new old stock for this rare 3 decade old system ? Sadly no matter how good these guys are, coming up with the new repair parts will be a Hail Mary ! But we’re all cheering for you …

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(David Martin) #24

Well I called the service manager at The Ft. Myers dealer, to keep on their radar and got a shock! The parts are in and shes going in on Tuesday for the repairs!

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(Brett) #25

That’s fantastic. I hope you’re able to take some pics of everything if they make changes to the current setup.

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(Grooveman) #26

David …

Did the dealer come through on the set belt fix ?

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(David Martin) #27

Dropped her off Teusday, now waiting on a phone call, they got the parts.

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(Grooveman) #28

David …

So did the dealer come through with the seat belt fix ?

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(David Martin) #29

Well they have had it for over a week, but they only have one tech qualified for this repair? I got a message that says it should be done early this week. However I did throw a wrench in that I didn’t know of originaly, when the seats are fully lowered the retractable part locks up so when I dropped her off I made sure the seats were fully lowered.

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(Grooveman) #30

David …

I don’t know why but your campaign to fix your seat belt system has really piqued my interest.

I’ve heard many, many times that the system is warrantied for life, but so far I’ve never heard of one person who in recent times has actually gotten a dealer to do it. Oh me of little faith. So your post of the dealer saying they have all the parts and “bring 'er on in” stomped on my cynicism.

But wait now, after over a week of having your car they figure out that there is only ONE technician qualified to do the job. I’m wondering if that is in all of Florida or maybe the delay is while they fly someone else in from England or since the Tata company now owns Jaguar Motors from India.

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( Larry ) #31

I think you’ll find any technician that remembers or knows how to work on old XJ40’s hung up his tools many moons ago - or - maybe the dealer managed to get one out on a day pass from the local retirement home and gave him a free ear trumpet so he could answer questions about the old seat belt systems etc.

You never know!

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(Grooveman) #32

Larry …

If you’ve never worked with the passive seat belt system I can state from hands on experience that it’s not rocket science. Heck, it’s not even bottle rocket science. Everything just bolts in and there is no tweaking or adjustments required.

Unlike, for instance, the door handles that take a magician to repair and the hands of a 12 year old piano virtuoso to remove and replace :grinning:

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( Larry ) #33

For sure. The one tech (I presume) is boning up on righty-tighty/lefty-loosey as we speak, no doubt. :grin:

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(David Martin) #34

I was told about the one tech before I brouhgt her in, it did set off my internal alarm but hey, if they are willing to try , what can I lose! And the door lock is when I get it back! Seams the pasenger lock jumps up and down but stays locked. Pulled the fuse for now.

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(Mike Stone) #35

I have been following this entire thread and the discussion of a lifetime warranty on seat belts, and the issue of only one tech being able to work on the motorized seat belts piqued my curiosity about US federal law regarding manufacturers’ warranties and the maintenance of the seat belt systems. I found on the NHTSA site a letter dated 2002 from the chief counsel responding to an inquiry about seat belt warranties ( https://isearch.nhtsa.gov/files24416ogm.html ):

"Federal law authorizes the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) to issue motor vehicle safety standards that apply to the manufacture and sale of new motor vehicles and new items of motor vehicle equipment. NHTSA has exercised that authority and established Standard No. 208, Occupant crash protection (49 CFR Sec. 571.208), which requires safety belts to be installed at certain seating positions in new motor vehicles. In addition, Standard No. 209, Seat belt assemblies (49 CFR Sec. 571.209), contains minimum performance requirements for seat belt assemblies installed in new vehicles and sold as “aftermarket” equipment, and Standard No. 210 (49 CFR Sec. 571.210), Seat belt assembly anchorages, sets minimum standards for anchorage location and performance. Each new vehicle must comply with all applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards, including the requirements in Standards No. 208, 209 and 210. Federal law does not, however, require vehicles to comply with these standards after the first purchase for purposes other than resale.

None of the regulations or statutes administered by NHTSA require manufacturers to provide a lifetime warranty for seat belts. However, NHTSA has the authority to require manufacturers to replace seat belts under certain circumstances. If a vehicle or item of equipment is not more than ten years old and is determined to have a safety-related defect or fails to meet an applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standard, NHTSA can compel the manufacturer to remedy the defect or noncompliance without charge to the vehicle owner."

The letter went on:

“Your letter indicates that the automatic belt assemblies on your 1990 Ferrari Testarossa have ceased to function. A search of our recall database indicates that NHTSA or Ferrari have not determined that the automatic belt system of the 1990 Testarossa contains a safety-related defect. In the absence of such a determination, Ferrari is not required to repair or replace the belts by the statutes and regulations administered by NHTSA.”

So while some manufacturers offer lifetime warranties on the seat belt systems they apparently are not compelled to by US federal law.

By the way, the cited Standards 208, 209, and 210 are an interesting insight into what the auto manufacturers are dealing with. Standard 208 - which is quite lengthy - made my head spin.

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(David Martin) #36

Sorry to crush your sense of pessimism Grooveman!

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(David Martin) #37

And I give Jaguar of Ft. Myers, Fl. 5 stars!

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( Larry ) #38

Hey Groove, Texas to Florida sounds like a nice spring run eh? :rofl:

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(Brett) #39

So if I’m reading that right, it sounds like both modules and seatbelt motors were bad, and after replacement, everything works as it should? If true, I’m blown away that you got this accomplished.

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(David Martin) #40

I haven’t picked up the car yet but thats what they tell me!

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